Advances in Social Research
Category - Research Article
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Title:
Anthropometric Measurements of the Adolescent Girls in Relation to their Nutritional Status
Abstract:

The objective of the present study was to find out the anthropometric measurements of the adolescent girls in relation to their nutritional status. Present study was conducted in Udaipur district. Total sample of 240 adolescent girls was taken by random purposive sampling. Weight is an important guide to assess the current nutritional status and only 17.5 per cent subjects were normal in which majority were from urban area. As per NCHS standard, 63.7 per cent subjects were found under normal category of height for age Mean height of RY1&UY5 and RY2&UY7 was 2.09 and 2.07 m2 which was 90.6per cent and 90.1per cent of the standard height respectively. The mean BMI of RY1&UY5 and RY3&UY7 was 19.97 and 17.24 respectively.

Category - Research Article
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Title:
Consumer Behaviour and Consumption Pattern Towards Ready to Eat Food Products in Jammu City
Abstract:

One of the basic needs of the human being is food. It is vital for the normal functioning of the body parts and for a healthy growth. Consumer interest in ready-to-eat (RTE) and ready-to-serve (RTS) food is mounting due to their convenience, value, attractive appearance, taste and texture. This paper discusses the relationship between consumer buying behaviour and consumption pattern. First, we aim to review the market of ready to eat food products and study the factors that affect the buying behaviour of the consumer in Jammu city. Secondly, we aim to study the consumption pattern of the consumers in Jammu city.

Category - Research Article
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Title:
Role of Extension Education in Various Economic Policies of Agriculture Development
Abstract:

The policy will aim at infusing new dynamism through public investment, infrastructure development and much higher impetus for private investment. Working hunger and poverty and improve the sustainability of rural livelihoods in the face of increasing social, economic and physical shocks and stresses. Extension performs various functions such as provide out-of-school education, supply of inputs, arranging credit and marketing facilities, collecting data and enforcing regulations. The process of economic development involves in the long run a fundamental structural changes, in which agriculture declines in relative, then absolute importance. This decline has in all developed countries been associated with a dramatic increase in productivity in the sector, whether measured per worker or per unit of land. This combination suggests that in the long run there is a complementary relationship between the growth of industry and the growth of agriculture. The objective of long-term agricultural policy is to maximise this complementarities. There has been a tendency to forget this basic, historical relationship in the last two decades. Various economic policies are: Input Policies, Seed Policies, Irrigation policies, Fertilizer Policies, Farm mechanization and agricultural machinery policies, Credit policies, Output Policies, Import Policy, Export Policy and others help in development of agriculture. Extension can use its understanding of broad socioeconomic trends and its experience with other communities to help community decision makers asks the right questions.

Category - Research Article
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Title:
Role of Agricultural Extension in Commercialization of Agriculture
Abstract:
Role of agricultural extension in a commercialized agricultural system is different from such service in subsistence farming system. In the commercialized agriculture the extension service will mainly concentrate on the resourceful big farmers, with favourable environmental conditions and higher socio-economic status. Under the commercialized agriculture the number of farmers is to be reduced and the size of the farm land should be increased. This is a generally accepted concept in commercial agriculture. Do we have to accept this concept under each and every situation? We think the answer is “no”. By using improved technologies farmers can move towards commercial agriculture without considering the size of land. Under protected agriculture, farmers follow concepts of the commercial agriculture. Commercial livestock farming does not rely on the farm size except dairy farming.
However, the role of agricultural extension in the commercialized agricultural system is mainly dependent on the type and way of commercialization in a given society. We have to expect that agricultural extension services are supposed to fulfil many aims, from reducing rural poverty and improved livelihoods for rural households to increasing the overall production and contributing to foreign exchange earnings from exports. But the level and percentage of this contribution may vary from one situation to another.
Category - Research Article
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Title:
Farmers Income through Livestock Rearing and Cash Crop Cultivation in Dry Land Agriculture
Abstract:

The mean annual rainfall of western arid Rajasthan is 339 mm with a standard deviation of 158 mm as compared to 593 mm ± 217 mm. Due to erratic rainfall, the crop cultivation is at big risk. Livestock rearing is used as supplementary activity and a support system in lean periods of farming. The study was primarly based on the primary data for the year 2015-16 and conducted in dryland region of Rajasthan comprising of arid and semi-arid agro climate zones. The average income of farmers in these three districts from cultivation of cumin was ` 276962 per household while average income per household from livestock was ` 102030. Thus, 73 percent of the household income was contributed by crop production (cumin) and 27 percent by livestock rearing. The study revealed that an average household in Barmer, Bikaner and Churu district, 57.9 percent of total income of household was from moth crop production while 30.2 percent income was contributed by livestock rearing. In Jhunjhunu district the income farm crop production (40.90 per cent) and income from livestock (40.54 per cent) was almost equal, while 18.54 per cent of the total household income was from service or business.